Music Education Standards for New York

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Enrollment: 2,741,000

Music/Arts Education Policy

INTRODUCTION

Regulations have the force and effect of law.  Policy statements indicate the bases from which the Education Department carries out the intent of the Regulations.  Guidelines are provided as recommendations and should not be interpreted as requirements.

Note: Sections 100.1-100.9 of the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education can be accessed in their entirety at http://www.p12.nysed.gov/part100/opener.html.

DEFINITIONS (100.1)

  1. UNIT OF STUDY means at least 180 minutes of instruction per week throughout the school year, or the equivalent.
  2. UNIT OF CREDIT IS EARNED BY:
    1. the mastery of the learning outcomes set forth in a New York State-developed or locally developed syllabus for a given high school subject, after a student has had the opportunity to complete a unit of study in a given subject matter; OR
    2.  pursuant to section 100.5(d)(1) of this Part, a passing score of at least 85 percent or its equivalent on a department-approved examination in a given high school subject without the completion of a unit of study, and the successful completion of either an oral examination or a special project.

Note:

  1. SYLLABUS means a document stating the expected learning outcomes, including the goals, objectives, concepts, skills and understandings in a given subject.

AVAILABILITY OF REGENTS DIPLOMA AND COURSES (100.2(e))

Each public school district shall offer students attending its schools the opportunity to meet all the requirements for and receive a Regents high school diploma.  Students shall have the opportunity to take Regents courses in grades 9 through 12 and, when appropriate, in grade 8.

AVAILABILITY OF … ARTS SEQUENCES (100.2(h))

  1. All public school districts shall offer students the opportunity to complete a three- or five-unit sequence in each of the following areas:  career and technical education and the arts.
  2. All public school districts shall offer students the opportunity to begin an approved sequence in the arts in grade nine.

Note:   See Arts/Music Sequence for information.

TEACHING STAFF IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS (100.2(i))

The number of daily periods of classroom instruction for a teacher should not exceed five.  A school requiring any teacher more than six teaching periods a day, or a daily teaching load of more than 150 pupils, should be able to justify the deviation from this policy.

HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM OFFERINGS (100.2(q))

  1. School districts shall make available to their students all the options for earning a diploma, which are specified in section 100.5 of this Part.  Sufficient instruction shall be provided to meet all the State learning standards.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS IN GRADES PRE-KINDERGARTEN THROUGH FOUR (100.3)

  1. PRE-KINDERGARTEN AND KINDERGARTEN PROGRAMS IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND IN VOLUNTARILY REGISTERED NONPUBLIC SCHOOLS
    1. Each such school operating a pre-kindergarten or kindergarten program shall establish and provide an educational program based on and adapted to the ages, interests and needs of the children.  Learning activities in such programs shall include:
      1.  …
      2. dramatic play, creative art and music activities;
  2. PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS IN GRADES ONE THROUGH FOUR
    1. Required subjects.  During grades one through four, all students shall receive instruction that is designed to facilitate their attainment of the State elementary learning standards in:
      1. the arts, including visual arts, music, dance and theatre;

POLICY

  • The K-4 music requirement means all students are to receive instruction in classroom general music related to the Learning Standards for the Arts.  In order to meet the comprehensive set of knowledge, skills and understandings in music outlined by the Standards, students must receive classroom general music instruction. Participation in band, chorus and orchestra are considered skill development activities which are offered as electives for students demonstrating interest in instrumental and/or vocal music.  Performing groups are an important part of a well-balanced music program on all levels, but cannot stand as the totality of a student’s music education experience at the elementary level.

GUIDELINES

Grades One through Four

  • To ensure a balanced curriculum, the State Education Department recommends the following time allocations for the Arts throughout the school year.  In grades 1-3, 20% of the weekly time spent in school should be allocated to dance, music, theatre and visual arts; in grade 4, 10% of the weekly time spent in school should be allocated to dance, music, theatre and visual arts.
  • It is recommended that elementary level instruction be provided by certified Arts (dance, music, theatre and visual arts) teachers. If the classroom teacher alone must provide the instruction, he or she should address the State Arts Standards and meet the suggested time allocation.  The achievement expectations and time recommendations apply to certified Arts teachers, as well.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADES FIVE THROUGH EIGHT (100.4)

  1. PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS IN GRADES FIVE AND SIX
    1. Required subjects.  During grades five and six, all students shall receive instruction that is designed to facilitate their attainment of the State intermediate learning standards in the seven general curriculum areas:
      1. the arts, including visual arts, music, dance and theatre;

POLICY

  • The 5-6 music requirement means all students are to receive instruction in classroom general music related to the Learning Standards for the Arts.  In order to meet the comprehensive set of knowledge, skills and understandings in music outlined by the Standards, students must receive classroom general music instruction. Participation in band, chorus and orchestra are considered skill development activities which are offered as electives for students demonstrating interest in instrumental and/or vocal music.  Performing groups are an important part of a well-balanced music program on all levels, but cannot stand as the totality of a student’s music education experience at the intermediate level.

GUIDELINES

Grades Five and Six

  • To ensure a balanced curriculum, the State Education Department recommends the following time allocations for the Arts throughout the school year.  In grades 5 & 6, 10% of the weekly time spent in school should be allocated to dance, music, theatre and visual arts.
  • It is recommended that intermediate level instruction be provided by certified Arts (dance, music, theatre and visual arts) teachers. If the classroom teacher alone must provide the instruction, he or she should address the State Arts Standards and meet the suggested time allocation.  The achievement expectations and time recommendations apply to certified Arts teachers, as well.

ARTS UNIT OF STUDY IN GRADES SEVEN AND EIGHT (100.4(c)(1)(ix)(5)(ii)(6))

  1. Except as otherwise provided herein, all students shall be provided instruction designed to enable them to achieve, by the end of grade eight, State intermediate learning standards through:
    1.  the arts, including one-half unit of study in the visual arts, and one-half unit of study in music:
  1. (ii) requirements for subjects set forth in paragraph (1) of this subdivision and for languages other than English instruction set forth in section 100.2(d) of this Part may be reduced but not eliminated. Academic intervention services shall be provided in a manner that does not diminish instructional time to a degree that may prevent a student from achieving the State learning standards in any area required for graduation or from meeting local standards for promotion.  A principal shall consider a student’s abilities, skills and interests in determining the subjects for which the unit of study requirements may be reduced;
  2. A student may meet the required half unit of study in music specified in subparagraph (1)(ix) of this subdivision by participation in a school’s band, chorus or orchestra, provided that such participation is consistent with the goals and objectives of the school’s music program for grades seven and eight.

POLICY

  • Only performing organizations that are a regular part of the school program may be used to meet the one-half unit of study requirement.
  • The important expectations for student achievement specified in the Learning Standards for the Arts must be infused into the respective visual art, music (including band, chorus, and orchestra) dance and theatre programs.

GUIDELINES

  • To continue the essential developmental program in visual arts and music, it is recommended that visual arts and music be taught to all students in both grades 7 and 8.
  • Final examinations that address the expectations in all four Arts Standards should be given in both visual arts and music courses.
  • Since there are requirements for arts instruction in grades 5-6 (See C.R. 100.4(b)(1)(v)) it is not appropriate to meet the Grade 7-8 required instruction in grade 6.

GRADE EIGHT ACCELERATION FOR DIPLOMA CREDIT (100.4(d))

  1. Public school students in grade eight shall have the opportunity to take high school courses in mathematics and in at least one of the following areas:  English, social studies, languages other than English, art, music, career and technical education subjects or science courses.
  2. Credit may be awarded for an accelerated course only when at least one of the following conditions has been met:
    1. Accelerated students attend classes in a high school with high school students and pass the course on the same basis as the high school students.  Credit is awarded by the high school; or
    2. The student passes the course and the associated State proficiency examination or Regents examination, where available.  The credit must be accepted as a transfer credit by all registered New York State high schools; or
    3. In cases where no State proficiency examination or other appropriate state assessment is available, the student passes a course in the middle, junior high or intermediate school which has been approved for high school credit by the public school district superintendent(s), or his or her designee(s), of the district(s) where the middle, junior high or intermediate school and the high school are located.
  3. Such opportunity shall be provided subject to the following conditions:
    1. The superintendent, or his or her designee, shall determine whether a student has demonstrated readiness in each subject in which he or she asks to begin high school courses in the eighth grade leading to a diploma.
    2.  A student shall be awarded high school credit for such courses only if such student passes a Regents examination, a second language proficiency examination, or a career and technical education proficiency examination, or, if no such examinations are available, a locally developed examination which establishes student performance at a high school level as determined by the principal.
  4. Courses taken pursuant to this subdivision may be substituted for the appropriate requirements set forth in subdivision (b) of this section.

POLICY

  • The visual arts and music chairperson and teachers should be an integral part of the identification process which provides outstanding students the opportunity to take the first high school level visual arts or music course during grade 8.  Criteria and identification procedures must be established to determine visual arts or music readiness.  This provision must in no way be determined as a device to move an entire high school level course “down” to the eighth grade to meet the art and/or music graduation requirement.
  • Music Theory is the recommended course for acceleration in music.  Studio in Art is the recommended course for acceleration in visual arts.

Note: Section 100.4(h) contains three models for implementing Middle-Level Education programs. The three-model strategy provides options based upon the need and capacity of a district and its schools.

  • Model A (Follow Existing Regulations):  Schools operate under the current regulations to implement an effective middle-level program, ensuring that all students achieve the intermediate-level state learning standards.  Most schools will continue to work within this model and the present regulatory requirements taking full advantage of the flexibility that is provided within the Commissioner’s Regulations. No approval is required.
  • Model B (Strengthen the Academic Core):  Schools where students are struggling to reach proficiency in English Language Arts and Mathematics may need flexibility to emphasize literacy and numeracy.  These schools can propose a program that strengthens core academic subjects and effective Academic Intervention Services while providing all students with instruction that addresses all of the NYS Learning Standards, is of high interest to students and further reinforces core academic learning.  Schools may be granted regulatory relief to implement their proposals.
  • Model C (Develop Next Generation Schools/Programs):  Schools with demonstrated student success (i.e., not Model B schools) can propose new ideas for middle-level programs.  These schools can propose to restructure the full educational program (Model C#1) or parts of the educational program (Model C#2).  In either case, schools must ensure that all students receive opportunities to achieve all of the NYS Learning Standards.  Schools may be granted regulatory relief to implement their proposals.

No matter which operating model is implemented, all middle-level programs must be designed so that all students meet all twenty-eight NYS Learning Standards. Please see the complete section of the regulations for definitions, eligibility, application, planning, approval, and compliance requirements, http://www.p12.nysed.gov/part100/pages/1004.html

To support school districts and their schools with middle grades, regardless of which model they implement, the Department developed the Middle Level Indicators of Achievement Checklists for the Non-Tested Content Areas. The Department recommends that local school administrators and instructional staff use the checklists to determine strengths and opportunities for improvement in Music Education, Visual Arts Education and the other non-tested content areas. They are available in Word and PDF format athttp://www.p12.nysed.gov/cis/home.html#Memorandum.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS IN GRADES NINE THROUGH TWELVE (100.5)

ARTS (VISUAL ARTS, MUSIC, DANCE OR THEATRE) REQUIREMENTS IN GRADES 9 THROUGH 12 FOR STUDENTS WHO FIRST ENTER GRADE 9 IN THE 2001-2002 SCHOOL YEAR AND THEREAFTER (100.5(a)(3)(v))(b)(7)(iv)(e)(i)(v)(c))

  1. General requirements for Regents or local high school diploma
    1. Students first entering grade nine in the 2001-2002 school year, but prior to the 2008-2009 school year, shall have earned at least 22 units of credit including two credits in physical education to receive a Regents or local high school diploma.  Students first entering grade nine in the 2008-2009 school year and thereafter shall have earned at least 22 units of credit including two credits in physical education to receive a Regents diploma. Such units of credit shall incorporate the commencement level of the State learning standards in: English language arts; social studies; mathematics, science, technology; the arts (including visual arts, music, dance and theatre); languages other than English; health, physical education, family and consumer sciences; and career development and occupational studies.  Such units of credit shall include:
      1. visual arts and/or music, dance, or theatre, one unit of credit; and
  2. Additional requirements for the Regents diploma
    1. Types of diplomas
      1. Earning a Regents diploma.  Students first entering grade nine in 2001 and thereafter shall meet the commencement level New York State learning standards by successfully completing twenty-two units of credit and five New York State assessments distributed as specified in (a) through (k) below.  After passing the required New York State assessment or approved alternative in mathematics, science, and English language arts, the remaining units of credit required in that discipline may be in specialized courses.  A specialized course is a course that meets the requirements of a unit of credit as defined in section 100.1(a) of this Part and the New York State commencement learning standards as established by the commissioner.  A specialized course develops the subject in greater depth and/or breadth and/or may be interdisciplinary.  Successful completion of one unit of study in an interdisciplinary specialized course may be awarded only one unit of credit but may be used to meet the distribution requirements in more than one subject.  In a public high school, an interdisciplinary specialized course shall be taught by a teacher certified in at least one of the subjects.
        1. The Arts (including visual arts, music, dance and theatre), one unit of credit, which may be a specialized course that meets the arts standards at the commencement level as established by the commissioner.  Any arts course for which credit will be awarded to meet the one unit of credit requirement for graduation must be taught by a certified teacher and must follow a State-developed or State-adopted syllabus or a locally-developed or locally-adopted syllabus approved by the commissioner.
          1. Additional units in English language arts, mathematics, social studies, science, the arts, languages other than English, career and technical education, or any other subject area approved by the commissioner to a total of twenty-two units of credit.

POLICY

  • The State Education Department publication, Studio In Art:  A Comprehensive Foundation Course, is the course recommended to meet the one unit of credit graduation requirement in visual arts.  The other Comprehensive Courses listed on the Visual Arts Education flow chart may also be used to meet the graduation requirement:  Creative Crafts, Media Arts, Art History and Appreciation, and Design and Drawing for Production:  Syllabus.  Courses of study such as Computer Aided Design (CAD) or Introduction to Engineering Design (IED) may not substitute for DDP, and do not fulfill the Art/Music unit requirement.  For credit towards a Regents diploma, locally developed courses must be submitted for approval following the process stated below.
  • The State Education Department publication, Music In Our Lives, is recommended to meet the one unit of credit graduation requirement in music.
  • Music In Our Lives and Studio In Art:  A Comprehensive Foundation Course may be combined for one unit of Regents credit (one-half unit of credit in music and one-half unit of credit in visual arts), if the content is presented in a balanced manner.
  • Talented students may fulfill the high school diploma requirement by successfully completing one unit of credit in a Musical Knowledge course (See Music Education flow chart.)
  • Some Career and Technical Education (CTE) courses have been approved to fulfill the one unit graduation requirement in visual arts. The approved CTE courses are Design and Drawing for Production (DDP-1 unit) and the combination of Housing and Environment CORE (1/2 unit) and Clothing and Textile CORE (1/2 unit).
  • Other options to meet the one unit of credit graduation requirement include locally developed courses in dance, music, theatre or visual arts. Such courses must meet the one unit of credit requirement or equivalent and must address the student expectations specified under the general education commencement level performance indicators in the Learning Standards for the Arts.  If credit is to be used toward a Regents diploma, locally developed courses must be submitted for approval to the Curriculum, Instruction and Instructional Technology Team, Room 320 EB, State Education Department, Albany, NY 12234, no later than April 1st prior to the date of implementation.  An application form and information for course approval are available from the Department.
  • Students must have access to both music and visual arts courses.
  • Specific alternatives exist in the regulations; see Section 100.5(d).

GUIDELINES

  • Students should receive dance, music, theatre and visual arts instruction from persons certified to teach the particular subject area.
  • Dance, music, theatre and visual arts grades should be included in the computation of the student’s average and class rank.
  1. Earning a Regents diploma with advanced designation
    • To earn a Regents diploma with an advanced designation a student must complete, in addition to the requirements for a Regents diploma:
    1. Two additional units in a language other than English for a total of three units and the Regents comprehensive assessment in that language.  A student identified as having a disability which adversely affects the ability to learn a language may be excused from the language other than English requirement set forth in this subparagraph if such student’s individualized education program indicates that such requirement is not appropriate to the student’s special educational needs. Such a student need not have a sequence in a language other than English but must meet the requirements for the total number of credits required for a diploma.  Students completing a five-unit sequence in career and technical education or the arts (visual arts, music, dance, and theatre) are not required to complete the additional two units of the language other than English requirement for the Regents diploma with advanced designation but must still meet the requirements for the total number of units of credit.

POLICY

Three-Unit Sequence in Fine Arts

  • To fulfill the requirements for a three-unit sequence in fine arts for Regents Diploma credit, a student must successfully complete the following:

1 unit of credit in Studio in Art:  A Comprehensive Foundation Course;
1 unit of credit in Musical Knowledge or Attitude Development;
1 unit of credit in dance, humanities, media arts, music, theatre or visual arts.

Five-Unit Sequence in Fine Arts

  • To fulfill the requirements for a five-unit sequence in fine arts for Regents Diploma credit, a student must successfully complete the following:

1 unit of credit in Studio in Art:  A Comprehensive Foundation Course;
1 unit of credit in Musical Knowledge or Attitude Development;
3 units of credit in dance, humanities, media arts, music, theatre or visual arts.

Music Standards Information

LEARNING STANDARDS FOR ARTS EDUCATION

Standard 1:  Creating, performing, and participating in the arts
Students will actively engage in the processes that constitute creation and performance in the arts (dance, music, theatre, and visual arts) and participate in various roles in the arts.

Standard 2:  Knowing and using arts materials and resources
Students will be knowledgeable about and make use of the materials and resources available for participation in the arts in various roles.

Standard 3:  Responding to and analyzing works of art
Students will respond critically to a variety of works in the arts, connecting the individual work to other works and to other aspects of human endeavor and thought.

Standard 4:  Understanding the cultural dimensions and contributions of the arts
Students will develop an understanding of the personal and cultural forces that shape artistic communication and how the arts in turn shape the diverse cultures of past and present society.

Note:  For more complete information on the Arts Standards including key ideas, performance indicators and student work samples in dance, music, theatre and visual arts, see the document entitled, Learning Standards for the Arts (Revised Edition, April 1996), which is available electronically at http://www.p12.nysed.gov/ciai/pub/pubart.html or may be ordered by following the directions at http://www.p12.nysed.gov/ciai/pub/artscatalogpg.html.

The arts standards can also be found in Section 100.1(t)(v) of the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education.

Teacher Evaluation

Summary of the new evaluation requirements 

New York state’s comprehensive, rigorous new process for teacher evaluations, established in a law enacted in 2010, is dedicated to improving student learning by advancing teacher effectiveness. It requires teachers to be evaluated annually according to the state’s seven research-based teaching standards and the highly specific performance rubrics approved by the State Education Department. To meet these demanding criteria, evidence of teacher effectiveness must include multiple sources, not just student test scores.

This process of teacher evaluation calls for continual improvement for all teachers; requires a detailed Teacher Improvement Plan for those who are ineffective or developing; and expedites removal of those who, despite support and training, do not improve.

A key strength of New York State’s evaluation process is that it results from collaboration among policymakers, teacher leaders and other stakeholders. That collaboration was credited in New York’s success at garnering $700 million in federal Race to the Top funds.

Source: NYSUT website

New York Times article from 2/26/12 on teachers ratings: In Teacher Ratings, Good Test Scores Are Sometimes Not Good Enough

From the New York State United Teachers (NYSUT) Learn more about Teacher Evaluations website: What you need to know about Student Learning Objectives (SLOs)

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